The Class of 2018: Gen Z

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The end of the school year is always a time for joy as we celebrate our high school graduates who leave us, some ready for adulthood and others a bit tenuous as they take first steps to try out a new freedom of life beyond school. However, as I sat on each graduation stage this year and watched our seniors approach the stage, I could only marvel at what they have accomplished to get to this point in their lives. On their last walk as seniors, some walked forward with ease, poising at the top of the steps before moving forward as their names were called. Others came forward, somewhat shyly as the principal beckoned them to their diplomas. Then there were the dancers who took a brief moment to show the audience a more personal side as they pirouetted to music only they could hear. And, finally, we all paused in respect for teens who came on crutches or in wheelchairs to make their way slowly across the stage.

“Honestly, we are just a tight-knit group. Our graduation isn’t an individual accomplishment, It’s an accomplishment as a whole.”  (A graduate)

All together, regardless of color or ethnicity, gender or sexual identity, socio-economic background or parents’ level of education, these graduates are Generation Z, unique in that they were mostly born in 2000, the Y2K year that many of us feared. They were born in a year when we feared that technology might fail the world, all over a software glitch defined by the use of two- rather than four-digit calendar data. But software engineers fixed the Millennium Bug and turn-of-the-century babies instead bounced into a world that changed rapidly and radically as a result of technological advances. They are the Smart-tech generation, defined by the emergence of apps such as YouTube which began when they were just five. At seven they handled their parents’ newly released iPhones, and by ten years of age, their photos were showing up in Instagram accounts. They’ve tweeted, facebooked, snapchatted, face-timed, and texted their way through high school.

“They approach projects with a level of complexity and they take pride in their work. They actually built a foosball table from scratch and had an almost Jumbotron attached to it.”  (A teacher)

Today they are defined by their speed of communication with anyone and everyone in their circle of friends and beyond as well as a willingness to adopt and adapt devices and apps as quickly as the next new one appears. It doesn’t matter whether it’s the next thing that will come after Netflix or a faster way to share information and images that makes Instagram obsolete, this generation will continue to show their generational counterparts – from baby boomers to Gen X and Y – what it means to be a digital native in its most authentic iteration since the term was coined. As one teen said, “adults need to stop calling us millennials – we are not that at all.”

Gen Z cares. I have heard over and over again from their teachers, principals, and peers that recent graduates of our schools help each other out and are committed to others.

“They are empathetic and truly will go out of their way to support each other – in good and hard times.”  (A teacher)

They care about issues of significance in their community from mental health to the environment to school safety and beyond. They value their devices but they value adults more – teachers and principals alike – especially adults who have invested in developing positive and healthy relationships with them. These teens know the difference between teaching with quality and what they have come to refer to as “phoning it in.”

“They are lively, vibrant, determined leaders with strength and self-awareness. They get excited about being able to impact their community and they look at the world as opportunities.” (A teacher)

They understand the power of authentic community service that benefits others versus inauthentic service that simply gets them a check towards their diploma. They also know their voice matters at the ballot box as well as in making personal choices to walk or not in public support of different political points of view.

“They are varied and talented and passionate about their interests. They are serious about their music, the environment, and sciences.” (A teacher)

The Class of 2018 graduates have also accomplished a great deal in life before they walked across the stage these last few weeks. They already are accomplished musicians and singers online and in the local community venues. They’ve successfully lobbied for a law to support mental health services in schools across Virginia. Students in this cohort have a sense of voice and its evidence in those among them who have blogged, publicly spoken to the School Board and Board of Supervisors, written and performed a play of social activism, tutored peers and younger children, and created websites to give voice to issues of import.They’ve created, invented, and marketed start-up products that represent their entrepreneurial mindset. More of them are bilingual than at any other point in the history of our schools. They’re already on life’s journeys as artists and athletes, musicians and historians, designers and engineers. They’ve raised hundreds of thousands of dollars over their collective years in schools for local community charities, individuals with health challenges, and national organizations of for common good such as the American Heart Association.

I am fortunate to have had thirteen years as a superintendent to watch this cohort of recent graduates grow up. I’ve watched them paint and build with blocks in kindergarten, tackle their early reading books in first grade, perform with Orff instruments in fourth grade, and rise up from fifth to sixth grade. They have demonstrated their creativity and critical thinking in Destination Imagination in middle school. I’ve watched them adopt a can do mindset in the AVID program as they head towards being a first generation college student in their families. I’ve observed them running student tech help desks in our libraries and working as auto mechanic interns in our bus garage.

This group of young people has created, made, designed, invented, engineered, and produced learning across all thirteen years of their K-12 education. Our division is a better place today because of the Class of 2018.  You open windows to the future.

 

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Connectivity, Connections, and Connectedness #iste2015 #satchat

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SATnewjSaturday morning, #satchat entered my room live from #iste2015 in Philadelphia…

I was still in couch-based PD mode although the crowd was gathering in Philadelphia already and I hoped to soon connect face-to-face with friends and colleagues there. Some I know from past “in the room” interactions. Others I’ve only met in social media. However, through the power of my home wifi connectivity, coupled with past connections I’ve made in the twitter PLN, I feel as if I already know many from the PLN even if we have never met face to face.

In fact, I learned about this phenomenon at the first ISTE conference I attended. I was overwhelmed with the numbers, the offerings, the opportunities. I felt lost until I landed with the @writingproject team who were hosting an offsite opportunity to write collectively inside a Google doc. I felt welcomed by Bud Hunt (@budtheteacher) and Paul Oh (@poh)from the National Writing Project and others who were working to build together a digital narrative of learning that day. That moment shifted me into a reflective pause about the power of the PLN to be something more than just a casual exchange of resources.

This experience soon after entering the world of the PLN in Twitter circa 2009 (thanks to @paulawhite)  cemented for me that today’s connectivity opportunities come when people value the connection of relationships and take the time to sustain personal and professional connectedness. I began in 2009 to watch teachers inside my school district connecting with educators from around the world and I realized that the district I led was becoming more of an educational agora and less of a walled garden as each new member journeyed into social media. I even wrote about my observations of how twitter tore down my district’s walls in EdSurge.

In my reflective pauses over the years, I have come to believe….

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What we accomplish as humans – invent, design, make, build, engineer, construct, create, communicate, enact, learn- comes from our interactions together whether connecting face to face or in online communities. The power of community learning has always allowed us to connect and leverage our talents, capabilities and competencies to learn more brilliantly together than apart. We consult, share, learn, teach, mentor and apprentice in ways that have become so naturally a part of our DNA that we seldom stop to consider how much of our learning occurs outside of the mostly passive 20th environments we label as school.

The genius of humanity becomes amplified through our relationships – virtual or face to face…. 

techkidToday, we see the restoration of human-centered learning in our interactions online such as in #satchat, at pop-up learning cities such as #ISTE2015, and across classrooms being linked by current and #futureready initiatives to ensure that educators and our learners can take advantage of the world’s curricular resources.

Knowledge no longer belongs to a few sages. Libraries are no longer the source of static and limited physical learning artifacts. Much information – data, ideas, history, science, formulas – is freely distributed for often no more than the simple cost of taking the time to find it. Experts and expertise abound online.

The world is now as Pascal Finette says ” a global communication network” ….

IMG_4750We are all part of that whether we show up to meet, greet and hug each other in the same space or simply gather in virtual caves, around virtual campfires or connect and collaborate in virtual maker spaces.