Edublog Nominees


My Nominations for The 2010 Edublog Awards follow:

Best resource sharing blog: Cybrary Man’s Educational Web Sites because @cybraryman1 offers a cross-section of resources that addresses the system of needs within the educational community.

Best group blog: The Cooperative Catalyst because this group of influential educational thinkers and practitioners writes from the soul. They take on political, social-emotional, and educational topics that stimulate colleagues to think, reflect, and act both locally and globally. They provide leadership to moving our collective voices of hope for public education and positive change from the back to front channel of virtual dialogue. The November National Day of Blogging that the “catalysts” helped support is a great example of their “sway” as a blogging team.

Best new blog: Venture Pragmatist by @chadratliff because he has moved beyond producing Edurati Review to publishing his own critical pieces, including one that garnered attention from across the virtual community, My One Wish to be Superman. He connects the policy, economics, and politics of our current education world. But, he also nails the social-emotional foundation of our work.

Most influential blog post: “A Modest Blog Proposal” at My Island View by Tom Whitby,@tomwhitby, started pulling the PLN tribe together into a movement to take our voices out of the back channel and into the front channel of public dialogue about real reform in the national debate about public education. As a result of that post, 118 edubloggers posted to REBELSbloggers wallwisher site and that site was reposted and tweeted throughout the world. Tom’s work spawned a next step following the October 17 event; a second National Day of Blogging for Real Ed Reform on November 22. The challenge that Tom put in front of the PLN turns our voices into not just an event but a movement of grassroots educational reformers.

Best teacher blog: Aviva Dunsiger’s blog space, A Primary Blog for the 21st Century,  because @Grade1 teaches us about the learning needs and capabilities of young children. Anyone who can figure out how to use Today’s Meet with 6-7 year-olds offers insight into how we can engage all children, providing them access to the best learning tools we can offer. She’s fearless in pursuing her own learning and you see that in her blog.

Best student blog: Nicholas Acres for A Nic in Time or Nic der Zeit (bilingual blog). Nicholas began his own wiki at Crozet Elementary in 5th grade and became a blogger last year as well. Check out the cluster map of hits from around the world on his site! He not only is a learner in Albemarle but as a sixth grade student this year, he’s also become a very young teacher of teachers in our professional development work in addition to his online presentation at k12onlineconference.org.

Best school administrator blog:  A Principal’s Reflections by Eric Sheninger, @nmhs_principal, because he clearly has influenced administrative peers to understand the power of social media as a learning and communication tool. He has become a fierce advocate of social media tools and makes himself available to others as a champion of contemporary learners, learning, and communication.

Best educational use of video / visual: SpeEd Change because Ira Socol, @irasocol, designs his blog to include video and photo imagery to enhance the passionate voice emergent in each of his posts. He takes on tough issues, offering insight and opinion, using coherent, transmedia imagery to illustrate historical background and point of view.  The use of image in his posts also amplifies the meaning of language that can get lost in flat print. The SpeEdChange blog contextualizes the concept of Universal Design for Learning. As a result of the audio, video, and visual tools embedded in each post, those who otherwise might face barriers to reading his posts are provided access to process each post auditorially and through imagery. The November 22 National Day of Blogging graphic he created had iconic impact across hundreds of posts.

Best educational wiki: Crozet 5th Grade created by @paulawhite and her elementary kids because this wiki represents the unified work of a teacher and the learners she serves to figure out together how to integrate an entirely new learning tool -wikis- into their toolbox. The site provides perspective on what and how children learn as designers, builders, thinkers, problem-solvers, evaluators, and collaborators. They, together, explore content knowledge and technology applications in ways that transcend the limits educators artificially place on what elementary children can accomplish.

Best Individual Blog: “school finance 101” Bruce Baker, @schlfinance101, has create a remarkable space where he takes current critical issues and challenges of educational policy and links them cogently to the economics of education. He takes “geek” stats and renders them into language that can be understood by anyone who has the willingness to learn from his work.

About pamelamoran

Educator in Virginia, creating 21st c community learning spaces for all kinds of learners, both adults and young people. I read, garden, listen to music, and capture photo images mostly of the natural world. My posts represent a personal point of view on topics of interest.
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2 Responses to Edublog Nominees

  1. Thank you so much for the nomination! That means a lot. I’m glad that you find my blog posts helpful. I love learning from you on Twitter, and I’m so fortunate to have you as part of my PLN!

    Aviva

    • pamelamoran says:

      Aviva,

      I am always ambivalent about participating in “awards” nominations but see this as an opportunity to share perspectives on some of the many amazing practitioners in the virtual community who use social media to advance the learning of young people they serve, to learn with and from colleagues beyond their own habitats, and to model innovative applications of technology to accelerate connected learning. Your work provides such a model and if we can use this “edublog awards” to advance such models, then perhaps what I see as the costs of “awards” can be balanced by the benefits of identifying some of the many who use best practices day in and out. So, thank you for the comment and for being someone who lives and breathes lifelong learning!

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